Finest Non Premium Gasoline–Double Money Back

Sign, Sign, Everywhere a Sign #17 |

1939 California Service Station -- Between Tulare and Fresno on U.S. 99. A large variety and great number of service stations face highway.

1939 California Service Station

Photographer:  Dorothea Lange

Between Tulare and Fresno on U.S. 99. A large variety and great number of service stations face highway. California, 1939. May. Photograph retrieved from the Library of Congress, www.loc.gov/item/fsa2000003102/PP/. (Accessed March 29, 2017.)

Part of: Farm Security Administration – Office of War Information Photograph Collection

Note – This image has been digitally adjusted for one or more of the following:
– fade correction,
– color, contrast, and/or saturation enhancement
– selected spot and/or scratch removal
– cropped for composition and/or to accentuate subject matter
– straighten image

California, great depression, Sign, Sign, Everywhere a Sign, vintage image
0 comments

Fort Laramie National Historic Site

Three from the Road #22 – 2010 trip1

Fort Laramie, Wyoming, July 9, 2010

Originally established as a private fur trading fort in 1834, Fort Laramie evolved into the largest and best known military post on the Northern Plains before its abandonment in 1890.  The original post, named Fort William by its founders, Robert Campbell and William Sublette, was rectangular and small – just 100 by 80 feet – the palisade formed by cottonwood logs, hewn 15 feet high. In 1841, rivalry with a competing fort led the owners to replace Fort William with a larger, adobe walled structure they named Fort John. The U.S. Army purchased Fort John in 1949 as a part of a plan to establish a military presence along the emigrant trails and, on June 26, the post was officially renamed Fort Laramie, beginning a half century tenure as a military fort. “As the years went by, the post continued to grow in size and importance. Fort Laramie soon became the principal military outpost on the Northern Plains. Fort Laramie also became the primary hub for transportation and communication through the central Rocky Mountain region as emigrant trails, stage lines, the Pony Express, and the transcontinental telegraph all passed through the post.”2

Fort Laramie, Wyoming, July 9, 2010

From 1890 when the Army hauled down the flag for the last time until 1938 when the Federal Government reclaimed the place as a National Monument, a span of almost a half-century, Fort Laramie slept in the sun, dreaming of faded glory. Although a few perceptive individuals recognized its lingering historic value, and many visited it out of curiosity, its status during this period was that of a country village, not altogether deserted but looking rather forlorn, like a tornado-ravaged community which never bothered to rebuild.

The desolation was the result of the wholesale demolition of buildings that occurred in 1890 and the decade following. This is not to condemn those responsible because in the 1890s there was a scarcity of local lumber for construction and there was no thought, in or out of Government, of reserving Fort Laramie for future park purposes. Indeed, it would be 25 years before anyone of record would suggest publicly that the few buildings remaining should be preserved for posterity.3

Fort Laramie National Historic Site, Wyoming, July 9, 2010

Our visit to Fort Laramie on July 9, 2010, was late in the day after stopping at several other places.  We were tired and didn’t spend as much time looking through the fort as we would have liked to – and we still were an hour away from where we planned to stop.


Endnotes

  1. Three from the Road is a series sharing images from places we’ve visited.  Initially, each post included thee images, related by a randomly selected location or topic. Posts now may be random choices or pre-planned sequences.  This post is in a series sequentially sharing images from our 2010 trip west.
  2. Fort Laramie: Crossroads of a Nation Moving West – National Park Service
  3. Fort Laramie as Country Village and Historic Ruin – Park History, 1834-1977, National Park Service, page 40 of 266,

References

3 from the road, destinations, history, museum, parks, photography, places, plains, travel, Wyoming
0 comments

Art Deco Detail

21st Century Digital #21

Art Deco Column Capital details, Mississippi War Memorial Building, Jackson, Mississippi. 2008. October 9.
Built in 1939 beside the Old Capitol.
A Works Progress Administration (WPA) project.

Highsmith, Carol M, photographer.

Photograph retrieved from the Library of Congress, www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2010630097/. (Accessed March 09, 2017.)

Medium: 1 photograph : digital, TIFF file, color.

Highsmith, a distinguished and richly published American photographer, has donated her work to the Library of Congress since 1992. Starting in 2002, Highsmith provided scans or photographs she shot digitally with new donations to allow rapid online access throughout the world. Her generosity in dedicating the rights to the American people for copyright free access also makes this Archive a very special visual resource.

Note – This image has been digitally adjusted for one or more of the following:
– fade correction,
– color, contrast, and/or saturation enhancement
– selected spot and/or scratch removal
– cropped for composition and/or to accentuate subject matter
– straighten image

21st Century Digital, art, Mississippi, museum, photography
0 comments

Lewistown, Chokecherries and “What the Hay!”

September 2007
Music: “When it Rains” by Anna Coogan and North19 track
added using YouTube AudioSwap

While in Montana in September 2007, we had plans to stop in Lewistown to get set up with a satellite internet system. The installer, Ron, had an extra RV spot at his home for friends, complete with hookups and invited us to stay there for a few days. The satellite system was a new model and there were a few wrinkles in getting it set up right. Ron was a member of an on-line RV forum I participated in. Retired, Ron did satellite system installs for other forum members at one price no matter how long it took. While there, we shared supper with Ron and his wife several times in their house and once at the Black Bull Saloon and Steakhouse in Hobson. We also took in the 2007 Lewistown Chokecherry Festival and the What the Hay “hay art” contest that stretched over 21 miles in Judith Basin County between the towns of Hobson and Windham. As, well they took us on a couple of other drives out into the Montana countryside. “What the Hay” is now also called the “Montana Bale Trail.”

__________

Lewistown, Chokecherry Festival, and Montana Bale Trail information:

festivals, landscape, Montana, mountains, people, photography, places, travel, video, wildlife
0 comments

Signs of the Times

Sign, Sign, Everywhere a Sign #16 |

Signs of the Times -- An elaborate painted sign, of four completed in three days in 2015 by "lettermen," as artistic sign painters call themselves, who met for a convention in Cincinnati, Ohio, and stopped by the American Sign Museum in the industrial Camp Washington neighborhood to see the museum and demonstrate their trade.

A mural in Cincinnati that depicts a sign painter in action using “distressed” techniques in which the painter creates the illusion of an old and faded sign, but all at once from scratch on a brand new sign.

Photograph by Carol M. Highsmith, October 18, 2016

An elaborate painted sign, of four completed in three days in 2015 by “lettermen,” as artistic sign painters call themselves, who met for a convention in Cincinnati, Ohio, and stopped by the American Sign Museum in the industrial Camp Washington neighborhood to see the museum and demonstrate their trade. Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio, United States, 2016. -10-18. Photograph retrieved from the Library of Congress, www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2016632971/. (Accessed April 02, 2017.)

Credit line: Photographs in the Carol M. Highsmith Archive, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.
Purchase; Carol M. Highsmith Photography, Inc.; 2016; (DLC/PP-2016:103-4).
Forms part of the Carol M. Highsmith Archive.

Highsmith, a distinguished and richly published American photographer, has donated her work to the Library of Congress since 1992. Starting in 2002, Highsmith provided scans or photographs she shot digitally with new donations to allow rapid online access throughout the world. Her generosity in dedicating the rights to the American people for copyright free access also makes this Archive a very special visual resource.

Note – This image has been digitally adjusted for one or more of the following:
– fade correction,
– color, contrast, and/or saturation enhancement
– selected spot and/or scratch removal
– cropped for composition and/or to accentuate subject matter
– straighten image

art, Ohio, photography, Sign, Sign, Everywhere a Sign
0 comments
%d bloggers like this:

30 queries in 0.476773 seconds.