Toll Booth

21st Century Digital #24 |

Toll booth at the entrance of Historic New Harmony, Indiana. 2009. May 9. Photograph: Carol M. Highsmith

Toll booth at the entrance of Historic New Harmony, Indiana. 2009. May 9.

New Harmony is a historic town on the Wabash River in Harmony Township, Posey County, Indiana, United States. It lies 15 miles (24 km) north of Mount Vernon, the county seat. The population was 789 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Evansville metropolitan area.

Established by the Harmony Society in 1814, the town was originally known as Harmony (also called Harmonie, or New Harmony). Bought at two dollars an acre, the 20,000-acre (8,100 ha) settlement was the brainchild of George Rapp and was home exclusively to German Lutherans in its early years. Here, the Harmonists built a new town in the wilderness, but in 1824 they decided to sell their property and return to Pennsylvania. Robert Owen, a Welsh industrialist and social reformer, purchased the town in 1825 with the intention of creating a new utopian community and renamed it New Harmony. While the Owenite social experiment was an economic failure just two years after it began, the community made some important contributions to American society.

New Harmony became known as a center for advances in education and scientific research. New Harmony’s residents established the first free library, a civic drama club, and a public school system open to men and women. Its prominent citizens included Owen’s sons, Indiana congressman and social reformer Robert Dale Owen, who sponsored legislation to create the Smithsonian Institution; David Dale Owen, a noted state and federal geologist; William Owen; and Richard Owen, state geologist, Indiana University professor, and first president of Purdue University. The town served as the second headquarters of the U.S. Geological Survey and numerous scientists and educators contributed to New Harmony’s intellectual community, including William Maclure, Marie Louise Duclos Fretageot, Thomas Say, Charles-Alexandre Lesueur, Joseph Neef, Frances Wright, and others. (Wikipedia)

Photograph retrieved from the Library of Congress, www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2010630184/. (Accessed March 05, 2017.)

Credit line: Carol M. Highsmith’s America, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

Photograph: Carol M. Highsmith

Medium: 1 photograph : digital, TIFF file, color.

Highsmith, a distinguished and richly published American photographer, has donated her work to the Library of Congress since 1992. Starting in 2002, Highsmith provided scans or photographs she shot digitally with new donations to allow rapid online access throughout the world. Her generosity in dedicating the rights to the American people for copyright free access also makes this Archive a very special visual resource.

Note – This image has been digitally adjusted for one or more of the following:
– fade correction,
– color, contrast, and/or saturation enhancement
– selected spot and/or scratch removal
– cropped for composition and/or to accentuate subject matter
– straighten image

21st Century Digital, history, Indiana, landscape, photography, road trip
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Covered Wagon Ferry Restored in Wyoming

"Covered Wagon Ferry Restored in Wyoming" | article from Popular Science, June 1950from Popular Mechanics, June 1950

Increasing traffic in 1927 forced abandonment of Menor’s Ferry, for 35 years the only connection between the east and west sides at Jackson Hole, Wyo. Instead, a steel bridge was built near by over the Snake River. After 22 years of inactivity. the ferry has been restored by Rockefeller interests. The replica was achieved by examining old photographs and original remnants of the rotting ferry gear. New visitors to this ferry at Moose, Wyo. may ride across a real piece of the old West.

Carrying this old Conestoga wagon and team of horses, the ferry makes its initial trip across the Snake River after the restoration.

Carrying this old Conestoga wagon and team of horses, the ferry makes its initial trip across the Snake River after the restoration.

Menor's ferry - The current is the ferry's "motor."

Menor’s Ferry – the current is the ferry’s “motor.”

Menor's Ferry - A winch changes the angle of the boat in the current and, thus, its direction of travel.

A winch changes the angle of the boat in the current and, thus, its direction of travel.


Additional images and information:

An early photo of Menor's Ferry in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, from the days before the river was bridged.

An early photo of Menor’s Ferry in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. Note the covered wagons on the left.

Another early ferry photo from before the river was bridged. Note the early 20th century auto on the ferry and the dirt road on the far side leading from the ferry landing.

Another early ferry photo from before the river was bridged.  Note the early 20th century auto on the ferry and the dirt road on the far side leading from the ferry landing.

Menor’s Ferry after 1950 restoration carrying covered wagon and team of horses across Snake River.

Menor’s Ferry after restoration completion in 1950 carrying covered wagon and team of horses across Snake River.

The current Grand Teton National Park ferry, operated seasonally by National Park Service interpretive rangers and able to carry up to 20 passengers, was built in 1999.  The photos below are from a ride we took on it in July 2010.

National Park Service interpretive ranger operating Menor's Ferry, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

National Park Service interpretive ranger operating Menor’s Ferry, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

On board Menor’s Ferry, looking across the Snake River towards Bill Menor’s cabin and store, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

On board Menor’s Ferry, looking across the Snake River towards Bill Menor’s cabin and store.


history, landscape, mountains, museum, photography, places, river, tourism, travel, vintage articles, Wyoming
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Katrina

21st Century Digital #29

Highsmith, Carol M, photographer. Only steps left after 2005 Hurricane Katrina, Mississippi coast, Mississippi, 2006. March 3.

Only steps left after 2005 Hurricane Katrina, Mississippi coast, Mississippi, 2006. March 3.

Photograph retrieved from the Library of Congress, www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2010630054/. (Accessed March 07, 2017.)

Credit line: Carol M. Highsmith’s America, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

Photograph: Carol M. Highsmith

Medium: 1 photograph : digital, TIFF file, color.

Highsmith, a distinguished and richly published American photographer, has donated her work to the Library of Congress since 1992. Starting in 2002, Highsmith provided scans or photographs she shot digitally with new donations to allow rapid online access throughout the world. Her generosity in dedicating the rights to the American people for copyright free access also makes this Archive a very special visual resource.

Note – This image has been digitally adjusted for one or more of the following:
– fade correction,
– color, contrast, and/or saturation enhancement
– selected spot and/or scratch removal
– cropped for composition and/or to accentuate subject matter
– straighten image

21st Century Digital, landscape, Mississippi, photography
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On-The-Go Camping by Wade Mitchell

Camping Blast-from-the-Past #2

contentPopular Mechanics;  June 1969

ENGINEERS ASK RV MANUFACTURERS TO TEST BRAKES. Some experts say that within a year the Department of Transportation may require brake performance certification on all RVs. The Society of Automotive Engineers wants manufacturers to help set up workable standards. Eventually, every trailer, van and motor coach may be required to carry a plate specifying brake-stopping distances.

DISC BRAKES FOR TRAVEL TRAILERS. One of the largest manufacturers told PM privately that “disc brakes are inevitable on travel trailers.” Reasons cited include the disc brakes’ proven advantages on downhill grades, through water and in panic stops. They start stopping sooner, almost never fade. Currently, all trailers have drum brakes as standard equipment. Disc-brake kits are available now, but the question of how to power a trailer-installed disc brake is not yet settled.

CAMPER CONVERSION BOLTS TO VAN BACK! That’s right—the new Bovan unit is a compact coach-section designed to attach to the tail end of such vans as the Ford Econoline series, Dodge A-100 series and Chevy and GMC vans. The maker claims it will fit any Detroit van built since 1962 without modifications. To install a Bovan (for Back of Van) the buyer merely removes the van’s rear doors and rear bumper. The Bovan then slips into position like a glove. (Installers may use the same holes formerly used for doors. Rail clamps will complete the installation.) Bovan says that you can add one in only 30 minutes. Inside the add-a-coach section are a dinette, bed, toilet and kitchen unit. Bovan is made by Easom Engineering, Detroit, Mich.

IS A SUPER-LIGHT TENT TRAILER COMING? The sudden interest in subcompact cars has prompted new tent-trailer designs that can be towed by any of them, according to experts. Ford is already selling the Maverick and the even smaller Ford Phoenix is due in 1971. Chevrolet may market the XP 887. American Motors is expected to announce a subcompact reviving the famous name of Hornet. Can such cars tow a trailer? Maybe yes, maybe no. The aggressive tent-trailer industry won’t take chances. Scaled-down versions of the most successful deluxe models may be announced in late 1969.

HOW ABOUT AN ALL-CANVAS CAMPER TOP? You can get one now with a peaked roof, rear door and sidewall curtains in a shape amazingly similar to wood coaches. The new canvas model from Off-Road Campers, Inc., Box 158, Dearborn, Mich. 48121, weighs about 198 pounds, has nylon strip slides on all moving surfaces, independent tent-bow construction and ozone-resistant and weathertight seals. For the family with a coach-storage problem, this may be one answer.

WRAPAROUND CONTROL PANELS FOR PICKUP TRUCKS? The GMC Truck and Coach Div. has been experimenting with new control panels which monitor virtually every moving part of the vehicle. Dash instruments start to the left of the driver, then sweep across in front of him and around to his right. Everything is easily read and operated without reaching. Though the system was designed for heavy-duty carriers, the concept of wraparound control panels for pickup trucks is obviously worthwhile.

CHEVROLET ANNOUNCES AUTOMATIC VEHICLE SELECTOR. Anyone interested in Chevrolet camper vehicles can get instant statistics such as gross weight, suspension capacity, transmission options, axle ratios, trailer-hitch type and many other facts on a handy new slide-rule calculator. This highly attractive tool, called Vehicle Selector, is now available from Chevrolet dealers. It should help solve problems caused by salesmen who lack knowledge about recreation vehicles.

camping, history, innovation, RV, RV manufacturer, RV products, vintage articles
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Lincoln Statue

21st Century Digital #28

Highsmith, Carol M, photographer. Bronze statue of Abraham Lincoln and his horse at the Lincoln Summer Home located on the grounds of the Armed Forces Retirement Home in northwest Washington, D.C. 2008.

Bronze statue of Abraham Lincoln and his horse at the Lincoln Summer Home located on the grounds of the Armed Forces Retirement Home in northwest Washington, D.C. 2008.

The sculptors are Stuart Williamson and Jiwoong Cheh; working for the design shop StudioIES in Brooklyn; New York. The statue differs from so many others of Abe in that this one actually shows him with a slight smile; as if Lincoln is greeting a valued friend or relative upon arrival at his summer home.

Photograph retrieved from the Library of Congress, www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2010630142/. (Accessed March 07, 2017.)

Credit line: Carol M. Highsmith’s America, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

Photograph: Carol M. Highsmith

Medium: 1 photograph : digital, TIFF file, color.

Highsmith, a distinguished and richly published American photographer, has donated her work to the Library of Congress since 1992. Starting in 2002, Highsmith provided scans or photographs she shot digitally with new donations to allow rapid online access throughout the world. Her generosity in dedicating the rights to the American people for copyright free access also makes this Archive a very special visual resource.

Note – This image has been digitally adjusted for one or more of the following:
– fade correction,
– color, contrast, and/or saturation enhancement
– selected spot and/or scratch removal
– cropped for composition and/or to accentuate subject matter
– straighten image

21st Century Digital, art, history, museum, parks, photography, Washington D.C.
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