Haw Creek http://haw-creek.com A mix of travel, RVs, photography and more. Tue, 15 Aug 2017 06:00:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.8.1 63367170 Two-Story British Trailer (1952) http://haw-creek.com/two-story-british-trailer-1952/ http://haw-creek.com/two-story-british-trailer-1952/#respond Tue, 15 Aug 2017 06:00:00 +0000 http://haw-creek.com/?p=7446 Popular Mechanics, May 1952

Two-story British Trailer - Only 24 feet long, the two-bedroom trailer maneuvers easily. Its over-all height is 12 feet 3 inches, including the chimney.

Only 24 feet long, the two-bedroom trailer maneuvers easily. Its over-all height is 12 feet 3 inches, including the chimney.

Two-Story British Trailer (1952) - Stairway to second-floor room can be seen to the left of the fireplace.You go upstairs to bed in a roomy British trailer built as a comfortable family residence. Two full-time double bedrooms eliminate the nuisance of converting living space into sleeping space nightly. The upper room is reached by a stairway from the living room. Other features of the trailer, which is called a caravan in Britain, are a complete bathroom, separate kitchen and a wood or coal-burning fireplace.

Left, stairway to second-floor room can be seen to the left of the fireplace.  Below, a cutaway view of the roomy trailer

Two-Story British Trailer (1952) - A cutaway view of the roomy trailer .

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Combination BED-TENT fits on car top (1952) http://haw-creek.com/combination-bed-tent-fits-on-car-top-1952/ http://haw-creek.com/combination-bed-tent-fits-on-car-top-1952/#respond Tue, 08 Aug 2017 06:24:00 +0000 http://haw-creek.com/?p=7443 Popular Mechanics, March 1952

Combination BED-TENT fits on car top (1952) - Popular Mechanics, March 1952

By Austin H. Phelps

VACATION campers, hunters and others who prefer to “go light” on both long and short trips will appreciate the compact utility of this bed-tent. It combines the weather protection of a sturdy tent and the comfort of a four-poster bed in one unit which folds into a flat bundle easily transported on any car-top carrier. The mattress and all bedding remain inside when the unit is folded for transport. Although, as dimensioned, the bed frame will accommodate an innerspring mattress of three-quarter size, most campers will prefer an air mattress, as it is much lighter, more compact, and easier to keep clean. Other bedding in addition to the mattress can be whatever the climate and season require. It takes only a few moments to ready the unit for occupancy. There are no stakes to drive and no ridgepole to string. Merely unstrap the unit and slide it from the car carrier, open the folding legs, pull up the self-locking ridgepole and there you are.

The first step in the construction is to build the angle-steel frame shown in the plan detail below. Cut the side and end-pieces to length and square the ends with a file. Position the pieces and mark and center-punch for bolt holes at the corners. Note that the frame is assembled with the angle web up on both the sides and ends. Drill holes for the corner bolts and also drill holes in the vertical webs for screws which hold hardwood strips. The strips are attached to the angles as detailed, using short flat-headed screws. Next, cut the plywood bottom and headboard, but, before installing the bottom, make sure that the frame is square. Then attach the plywood bottom with 1/4-in. flat-headed stove bolts with the heads countersunk in the wood and the nuts turned on from the bottom so that they bear against the steel angle.

Combination BED-TENT details (1952) - Popular Mechanics, March 1952

Note in the details on the opposite page that there is a headboard cut from 3/8-in. plywood and placed at the head of the bed inside the frame. Next, bolt on the wooden facing strips, noting that the carrying-handle brackets at the rear of the bed frame fit over the facing strips. Weld hanger brackets at the front and rear of the frame on the right-hand side to form bearing brackets for the roller as in the lower de-tail on the opposite page.

Combination BED-TENT details (1952) - Popular Mechanics, March 1952

Note in the detail that the length of the ridgepole and the purlins is given as 7 ft., but, before cutting material, take careful measurements, as this dimension may vary. Flatten the ends of the conduit uprights in a vise, round the ends with a file and drill for 1/4-in. bolts. Make the 45-deg. bends in the ridgepole supports. Then assemble the three units and clamp them in position on the frame so that you can locate the holes for the purlin frames, the ridgepole, and also the holes for the over-center braces. After these parts have been bolted in place —note that all bolts are provided with wing nuts — assemble the roller, or winding drum, as in the lower details on the opposite page. As will be seen from the detail, the roller is provided with a removable crank and a ratchet-type lock which permits tightening the canvas to a uniform tension and holding the adjustment.

Combination BED-TENT details (1952) - Popular Mechanics, March 1952

Make four folding legs from flat steel as in the center right-hand detail on the opposite page. The leg brackets are bolted to the underside of the angle-steel frame at the corners and are provided with folding braces. At this stage the bed is placed on a level floor and the purlins and ridgepole are raised so that accurate measurements can be taken for cutting the canvas covering to fit. Note that the covering is attached to the frame on the left side with grommets and fasteners and that the right-hand edge is tacked to the roller. When tacking the canvas to the roller, allowance must be made for shrinkage of the fabric. The canvas closure at the head of the bed is provided with a plastic-screened opening and a separate canvas closure which is opened and closed by means of a sash, or awning, cord as shown. A slide fastener provides a double fly for opening the front of the tent covering. Both canvas ends are fastened at the bottom with grommets and are held taut with cord looped over the purlins and ridgepole. Locate the car-carrier shoes by placing the folded unit on the car-top carrier and marking pencil lines to indicate the position of the shoes. After bending to the required size from 1/8 x 1-in. flat iron, the shoes are attached to the bot-tom of the bed with stove bolts. Apply two coats of spar varnish to the plywood bot-tom, headboard and wooden rails and enamel metal parts in whatever color desired.

Combination BED-TENT fits on car top (1952) - Popular Mechanics, March 1952

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Cities of the Dead http://haw-creek.com/cities-of-the-dead/ http://haw-creek.com/cities-of-the-dead/#respond Mon, 07 Aug 2017 06:23:00 +0000 http://haw-creek.com/?p=7311 21st Century Digital #31

Highsmith, Carol M, photographer. Cities of the Dead Cemetery tombs, New Orleans, Louisiana. 2007.

Cities of the Dead Cemetery tombs, New Orleans, Louisiana. 2007.

The above-ground tombs in New Orleans cemeteries are often referred to as “cities of the dead.” Enter the cemetery gates, and you will be greeted by rusty decorative ironwork and blinded by sun-bleached tombs. Crosses and statues jutting from tomb surfaces cast contrasting shadows, adding to the sense of mystery. Votive candles line tombs on holidays, reminding you that the dead have living relatives who still care.

New Orleans has always respected its dead, but this isn’t the reason that our departed loved ones are interred above ground. Early settlers in the area struggled with different methods to bury the dead. Burial plots are shallow in New Orleans because the water table is very high. Dig a few feet down, and the grave becomes soggy, filling with water. The casket will literally float. You just can’t keep a good person down! The early settlers tried placing stones in and on top of coffins to weigh them down and keep them underground. Unfortunately, after a rainstorm, the rising water table would literally pop the airtight coffins out of the ground. To this day, unpredictable flooding still lifts the occasional coffin out of the ground in areas above the water table, generally considered safe from flooding. (Experience New Orleans)

Photograph retrieved from the Library of Congress, www.loc.gov/item/2010630059/. (Accessed March 06, 2017.)

Photograph: Carol M. Highsmith

Credit line: Carol M. Highsmith’s America, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

Medium: 1 photograph : digital, TIFF file, color.

Highsmith, a distinguished and richly published American photographer, has donated her work to the Library of Congress since 1992. Starting in 2002, Highsmith provided scans or photographs she shot digitally with new donations to allow rapid online access throughout the world. Her generosity in dedicating the rights to the American people for copyright free access also makes this Archive a very special visual resource.

Note – This image has been digitally adjusted for one or more of the following:
– fade correction,
– color, contrast, and/or saturation enhancement
– selected spot and/or scratch removal
– cropped for composition and/or to accentuate subject matter
– straighten image

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Touring A La Cart (1937) http://haw-creek.com/touring-a-la-cart-1937/ http://haw-creek.com/touring-a-la-cart-1937/#respond Sun, 06 Aug 2017 06:53:00 +0000 http://haw-creek.com/?p=7439 How to Build Trailers1

There’s no place like home – but when your home is in a trailer you can go where you will as free of house ties as the winds.  Here is the lure and lore of the open road.

Where ever the car can go. there goes the trailer home. For hunting or camping it is ideal, and the task of pulling up stakes to break camp consists of but starting the car. (1937)

Here is an interior view of the modern Covered Wagon-trailer. Plenty of room for all your fishing tackle and other equipment is afforded by lockers placed below the folding bed. (How to Build Trailers, 1937)

(Right, above) Inside this streamlined Aladdin Trailer home one finds all the conveniences of a deluxe apartment. The cutaway section at top reveals its roomy brightness, and the floor plan below shows the arrangement of appointments.

THE American gypsy spirit is building a huge new industry about the auto camp trailer. No less than 400 firms are building land yachts for auto touring.

Roger Babson, eminent statistician, declares that within 20 years over 20,000,000 people will own and use trailers.

Since there are so many trailers available, and since you, by the law of averages, are destined to become a trailer user, a few guiding principles born of experience will enable you to accurately judge the worth of a trailer design, and will forearm you with knowledge in the matter of touring a la your own “cart.” The first question that arises is usually, “What is the weight and size of most trailers? Can my car handle one easily? Do they cost much to own and operate?”

The length of the average trailer is from 12 to 17 feet over all. A good average is about 15 feet. In a trailer of this size from 2 to 4 persons, with all duffle, can be comfortably housed on a tour of long duration. The weight of such a trailer will be from 1,200 to 1,800 pounds, with 1,500 pounds about the average.

Full headroom is needed for a six-footer. This is furnished by crowning the roof well, or by constructing a “lantern” type roof similar to a street car, affording room for the head. Widths are a function of the bed length—from 72 to 77 inches. The latest trend is to use regular springs and mattresses instead of a day couch or davenport. Then no special linens are required.

The true trailer is of two-wheeled construction. It is the most popular, least expensive. Over an upset steel axle, two wheels are used to carry the load. A steel framework leading to a towing tongue is sprung to this axle. Upon the towing frame-work is erected the floor and the side pillars which constitute the body framing. All early trailers used wooden members for side framing, and this is quite satisfactory, as it is light. Usually the framework is bolted to steel channel lengths in the floor framework, making a light and rigid structure. Bodies are variously covered with dural, with pressed wood, with plywood, or with leatherette over mesh wire. Invariably an interior ceiling of light plywood is used. The air space between inner and outer walls is needed for insulation against heat and cold.

One of the most vital parts of the trailer is the hitch. Upon this link depends the safety of not only the occupants but all other cars on the road. A trailer hitch of the type shown above has been found to be one of the most dependable. Note that extra safety is provided by a chain.

One of the most vital parts of the trailer is the hitch. Upon this link depends the safety of not only the occupants but all other cars on the road. A trailer hitch of the type shown above has been found to be one of the most dependable. Note that extra safety is provided by a chain.

A semi-trailer type is found in the deluxe classification. This is a long trailer which imposes most of the weight on a turn-table platform installed in the rumble seat of the towing car. These greater accommodations require a roadster type car, and cannot be readily detached, as the weight is about 500 pounds on the forward end. On the true-trailer, the weights run from 125 to 150 pounds—light enough for a man to freely detach and park it in his backyard.

Extra Gallon of Gas Pulls Trailer 100 Miles

There is nothing gloomy or crowded about the interior of this Gilkie trailer. The ply-wood furnishes a light, strong method of construction, pleasing to the eye and easy to keep clean on the road. || The ocean can be brought right into your front yard when you own a trailer home. Scenes such as that above are duplicated at thousands of beaches. Left —One of newer types of trailer becoming popular.

A ball and socket towing arm, allowing independent movement for the trailer is be-coming universally used, and in some states is specified by law. Pin type yokes are to be avoided. Chains must be used as an auxiliary hitch to prevent accidents should the trailer hitch fail and the tow become wild.

Home builders of trailers usually purchase wheels, axles and have the welded frame made up for them, completing the woodwork themselves.

Tests on towing costs have resulted in the following acceptable averages: a trailer will cost 1 gallon of gas for every 100 miles towed. This presumes a light sedan used for towing, which is in good condition and not prone to using more than the normal amount of oil.

See to it that your trailer caravan has adequate locker provision for spare tire and worm jack for the trailer, a good old-fashioned kerosene lantern, tow rope, shovel, blocking boards, spare haywire, and a small kit of tools are aboard the trailer.

See to it also, in addition to the locker space required for the items mentioned above, that a sealed gurry bucket for garbage is installed which may be emptied at some fill after breaking camp.

Carry a most complete first aid kit and familiarize yourself in its use. And—this is important—carry TWO fire extinguishers.

Another matter is the water. The best tank is a seamless steel tank, with handhole plates for cleaning, and which has been tinned inside. This keeps water safe and furnishes an ample supply for long runs.


  1. Published by Modern Mechanix Publishing Company, Fawcett Publications Bldg., Greenwich, Conn.,1937

The first two images were actually a two page spread in the original publication:

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1937 Speed Laws and Gasoline Taxes http://haw-creek.com/1937-speed-laws-and-gasoline-taxes/ http://haw-creek.com/1937-speed-laws-and-gasoline-taxes/#respond Fri, 04 Aug 2017 20:31:00 +0000 http://haw-creek.com/?p=7436 from How to Build Trailers (1937)

Speed Laws and Gasoline Taxes in Effect in the United States 1937

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Atomic Reactor Makes Electricity http://haw-creek.com/atomic-reactor-makes-electricity/ http://haw-creek.com/atomic-reactor-makes-electricity/#respond Thu, 03 Aug 2017 06:27:00 +0000 http://haw-creek.com/?p=7429 Popular Mechanics, March 1952

Making history are these four bulbs as they glow with the first electricity ever produced by atomic energy. (Experimental Breeder Reactor I)

Making history are these four bulbs as they glow with the first electricity ever produced by atomic energy. (Experimental Breeder Reactor I)

Atomic Reactor Makes Electricity; Popular Mechanics, March 1952For the first time in history, useful amounts of electricity have been produced with atomic energy. The Atomic Energy Commission announced that although the power generated was only 100 kilo-watts and the project was entirely experimental, the result is another milestone in the atomic age. Heat energy was removed from an experimental breeder reactor by a liquid metal of a type not revealed. Sufficient heat was transferred to generate steam for driving the turbine and generator. Power generation is an incidental part of the breeder-reactor experiments being conducted near Idaho Falls, Idaho, but it is providing data about the handling of liquid metals under radioactive conditions. The principal function of the breeder reactor is to convert nonfissionable material into fissionable material more rapidly than the nuclear fuel is consumed, a process that would contribute to expansion of our atomic program. It can never be used to generate large amounts of power, but it is providing information that will be valuable in designing atomic power plants of the future, say scientists at the Idaho laboratory.

Heat from the atomic breeder reactor made the steam that spun the turbine and generator shown above.

Heat from the atomic breeder reactor made the steam that spun the turbine and generator shown above.

Scientists and technicians recorded their feat on the power-plant wall (Experimental Breeder Reactor I)

Scientists and technicians recorded their feat on the power-plant wall.


Today, Experimental Breeder Reactor 1 (EBR1) is decommissioned and has been designated as a U.S. National Historic Landmark. Located about 18 miles southeast of Arco, Idaho.  At 1:50 PM, December 20, 1951, it initially produced sufficient electricity to illuminate four 200-watt light bulbs.  I took the photos below during a 2010 visit to the site:

 At 1:50 PM, December 20, 1951, Experimental Breeder Reactor 1 (EBR!) produced sufficient electricity to illuminate four 200-watt light bulbs.

EBR-I subsequently generated sufficient electricity to power its building, and continued to be used for experimental purposes until it was decommissioned in 1964. (Wikipedia)

EBR-I subsequently generated sufficient electricity to power its building, and continued to be used for experimental purposes until it was decommissioned in 1964.

Electricity was first generated here on Dec. 20, 1951. On Dec. 21, 1951 ~ all of the electrical power in this building was supplied from Atomic Energy.

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Even a Motor Scooter can Haul Collapsible Trailer http://haw-creek.com/even-a-motor-scooter-can-haul-collapsible-trailer/ http://haw-creek.com/even-a-motor-scooter-can-haul-collapsible-trailer/#respond Wed, 02 Aug 2017 06:40:00 +0000 http://haw-creek.com/?p=7426 Popular Mechanics, May 1960

The trailer neatly folds away into a flat box seven feet long and five feet wide. It stands just three and a half feet off the ground. Made of Fiberglas and equipped with independent wheel suspension, the trailer can be assembled into a nifty camping van in just 10 minutes.

SOMETHING for the compact-car buyer—here’s a compact traveling van that even can be transported by a motor scooter. The trailer neatly folds away into a flat box seven feet long and five feet wide. It stands just three and a half feet off the ground. Made of Fiberglas and equipped with independent wheel suspension, the trailer can be assembled into a nifty camping van in just 10 minutes. Hinged sides that fold inward when closed up are pulled out to form the walls, complete
with windows. The ends fold down from the roof. One end has a window and wash basin while at the other end there’s a door with a window in it. There are two single beds which easily convert into a double bed. Storage cupboards are enclosed beneath the beds. During the daytime, a table folds down between the beds, turning the bedroom into a kitchen. To steady the caravan while it is being used, jacks at each corner lower to the ground. A towing bar attaches the van to the vehicle.

The trailer neatly folds away into a flat box seven feet long and five feet wide. It stands just three and a half feet off the ground. Made of Fiberglas and equipped with independent wheel suspension, the trailer can be assembled into a nifty camping van in just 10 minutes.

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1960 Tenting Tips http://haw-creek.com/1960-tenting-tips/ http://haw-creek.com/1960-tenting-tips/#respond Tue, 01 Aug 2017 06:08:00 +0000 http://haw-creek.com/?p=7420 Popular Mechanics, May 1960

Tips for Tenting -- Popular Mechanics, May 1960

DUSK WAS SETTLING DOWN several years ago on the banks of the St. Joe River in northern Idaho—but I wasn’t. I was struggling in the dim. tree-filtered light to read the directions on how to put up a spanking new umbrella tent.

My wife, who had started cooking operations, paused now and then to cast a hopeful glance at the man she married for worse. Fortunately, a neighboring camper strolled by. “My tent is just like yours.” he said.

Erect tent in the back yard and check equipment before setting out on a camping trip—especially if it is your first one.

Erect tent in the back yard and check equipment before setting out on a
camping trip—especially if it is your first one.

“First, you nail down the bottom of the tent with those spikes in that sack over there; then you fix the umbrella ribs this way—be sure you don’t get them upside down—and next you step inside the tent and …”

That was lesson No. 1 in the art of tenting—an art that has become so popular in the U.S. that more tents are now sold annually in the country than were used by both Blue and Gray soldiers throughout the entire Civil War.

The modern umbrella tent, which has become a favorite with campers. is tricky to erect the first time. Simple, the second. So it’s a good idea to conduct a dry run with
a new tent in your own back yard before you start out on a camping expedition. It may be raining at your camp site.

Other equipment can do with some testing, too. Even if you have used a gas stove for years—and especially if you have—it’s a good idea to check it out.

While camped last summer with the family at Oregon’s huge Honeyman State Park, I was visited by a lady in distress. Her stove wouldn’t work. She had wandered through the camp looking for a stove just like hers. Ours matched. Would I help? Remembering the kindly gentleman of the St. Joe, I walked—for miles, it seemed —to the lady’s camp where her husband was busily munching cookies while awaiting her return. Disconcerted, I nevertheless went to work and, with a borrowed bobby pin, unclogged the gas line.

(Left) Sheet of heavy plastic (building-supply stores sell it) on the tent site prevents moisture from seeping through floor of tent. (Right) Tent floor stays clean if there's a throw rug or towel at entrance for wiping feet.

(Left) Sheet of heavy plastic (building-supply stores sell it) on the tent site prevents moisture from seeping through floor of tent. (Right) Tent floor stays clean if there’s a throw rug or towel at entrance for wiping feet.

Planning a camping trip with a family is a big part of the fun. Everybody takes an interest in lining up the gear. Besides, it’s fun just to take a look at it now and then and speculate on what is coming. It is recommended that you give assignments and establish responsibilities before starting. You will be pleasantly surprised to find how eagerly the children will carry them out.

A water jug is almost indispensable in a car, boat and tent, particularly if children accompany you on a camping trip.

A water jug is almost indispensable in a car, boat and tent, particularly if children accompany you on a camping trip.

Air mattresses are standard equipment for camping now. If your lungs need exercise, you can blow and blow. But about $3 will get you a small and efficient hand pump. Beauty of this is that the youngsters will fight for the privilege of blowing up the mattresses. Even our five-year-old daughter insisted on taking her turn.

(Left) Having fish for supper? A piece of aluminum foil on the frying pan will make that job of dish washing afterwards a lot easier. (Right) Hand pump saves breath in inflating air mattress; children like to pump.

(Left) Having fish for supper? A piece of aluminum foil on the frying pan will make that job of dish washing afterwards a lot easier. (Right) Hand pump saves breath in inflating air mattress; children like to pump.

If the plastic valve stem on a mattress becomes worn and won’t hold in the pump, you can build the stem up again by applying plastic glue—the same material you use for patching the mattress. In a hurry, you can wrap some plastic tape around pump and valve sterns to hold them together.

Worn plastic valves on air mattresses can be "built up" again by application of liquid plastic coating

Worn plastic valves on air mattresses can be “built up” again by application of liquid plastic coating

Letting out the air from the mattresses should always be the first chore when you are breaking camp. The mattresses will be deflated when you are ready to take off. Incidentally, the mattresses make wonderful floats on a lake.

For additional recreation for the youngsters, carry along a spare inner tube and rope. Tie the rope to a tree limb, then attach it to the inflated tube. You have a swing which will attract playmates for your children from all over the camping area.

In national forests during fire seasons, you are required to have in your car a shovel, ax and pail. You might try picking up at an Army surplus store a folding shovel used by GIs for digging foxholes. Among other things, the shovel’s sharp point is excellent for scratching a small rain-runoff around your tent—and for digging clams on a beach.

A hatchet will serve, but a small handled ax is much better. Some of the wood you will have to chop is on the knotty side. The blade of the ax is also the best tool I have found for prying tent spikes out of the ground.

You can keep the chopping down to a minimum by looking for “squaw wood”—bits of dead trees found on the ground. Squaw wood serves as good kindling, and its bark makes the hottest fire with a low flame. If the woods are wet with rain, snap off dried twigs from tree trunks to get a fire going.

Cook on an open fire if you will. but a camp stove will keep everybody happier.

You need a stationary light of some kind. It can be either gas or battery powered, but you should have a light to place on the camp table in the evening, and in the tent upon retiring.

Another indispensable item is a water jug. It is handy to have in the tent at night, but even handier to have in the car while traveling. Many stops at service stations are saved. If you take a boat out fishing, the jug should go along.

Keep dishes—and dish washing—to a minimum. For $10, you can get a week’s supply of paper service for a family of four.

Probably the biggest saving in dish washing comes in the use of paper cups. We carry them in assorted sizes. Eight-ounce hot-drink cups for coffee and tea, nine-ounce cold-drink cups for milk and heat-of-the-afternoon beverages, and five-ounce cold-drink cups for water and breakfast fruit juices.

We bring along our regular silverware, but disposable forks and spoons can be used if vacation dish washing is to be kept to an absolute minimum. Many housewives today are using aluminum foil extensively in their cooking, but they too often forget it on vacation trips. Two or three rolls should be tucked in with the supplies.

My wife probably appreciates aluminum foil most when frying the day’s catch of fish. She molds a large piece of foil over the frying pan, and cooks the fish on this superimposed surface. The frying pan comes through the cooking process clean enough to require only rinsing.

Selecting the best possible camp site is highly important. In improved federal and state parks. the problem is relatively simple. Just try to get near a water faucet and avoid being too close to rest rooms which are used at night.

Midwesterners, I have noticed, when they first came to the timbered mountains of the West, are inclined to pitch tents in the deepest woods. If the woods are deep enough, they don’t warm up all day. And, if it has been raining, the tall timber can be downright uncomfortable. You want shade, but not too much.

Some camp sites in the mountains are of necessity in ravines, but avoid them if possible. The cool night air settles in the draws. And don’t pitch your tent where there is danger from rock slides or falling rocks. I have a friend who got quite a hole in his tent. He adds that he was lucky “not to get one in my head.”

Because you are camped in the mountains, you are not necessarily above the mosquito line. Last summer, one of my sons and I camped at high-altitude Lake Louise in Canada’s Banff National Park. As we ate our supper, the mosquitoes began dive bombing.

My son got an insect-killing bomb from the luggage compartment. Spraying this around the camp site and tent, he finished supper. By the time we were ready to hit the sleeping bags in the tent, there was not a mosquito in sight or sound. It was peaceful all night, although, once when I awoke, I heard a neighboring camper swatting desperately.

To help keep the floor of the tent free from ground moisture, place a piece of heavy plastic on the tent site before you erect the tent. If you carry gear on the top of your car, the plastic will do double duty as added protection against rain. The plastic is available at building-supply stores.

Then there is the matter of keeping the canvas floor of the tent clean. A big help is an old towel or throw rug placed at the entrance to the tent. Also handy is a “sawed-off” broom. Many campers use a child’s play broom or a whisk broom for sweeping the floor of the tent, but a regular broom with handle sawed off to size is most effective. The shortened broom will fit under the front seat of most cars.

If you have extra space—and careful packing will usually allow some—take along a rake with sawed-off handle. It will come in handy for clearing a mountain camp site.

Finally, as a highly important “be sure” item, be sure always to put gear—from ax to air mattress pump—in the car in exactly the same place each time. If you have to make camp in the dark, you will be happy you did. Even in the daylight, it is good to know just where everything is. Makes you feel at home on the trail.

As an assurance that you’re not forget-ting anything, run through this check-off list before you leave on a camping trip:

Shelter and Sleeping

  • Tent (take a couple of extra tent spikes).
  • Heavy plastic ground cloth.
  • Throw-rug or towel for front of tent.
  • Sleeping bags and pillows with cases.
  • Air mattresses (include liquid plastic for repairs).
  • Hand pump for mattresses.
  • Broom with sawed-off handle.

Eating and Cooking

  • Knives, forks, spoons, cups, plates. cereal or soup bowls. Paper cups and plates will add to the vacation: at least, use paper cups.
  • Oilcloth table cover (wind may blow away a plastic tablecloth).
  • Paring knife.
  • Butcher knife.
  • Large skillet. (Check to be sure it fits your camp stove.)
  • Two saucepans and lids.
  • Large kettle for heating water.
  • Pancake turner.
  • Mixing bowl.
  • Measuring spoons and cup.
  • Large unbreakable pitcher.
  • Coffeepot.
  • Toasting forks.
  • Icebox (optional).
  • Camp stove.
  • Aluminum foil—regular and heavy.

Clean-Up Gear

  • Vegetable brush.
  • Dishcloths and towels.
  • Paper towels.
  • Soap powder, kitchen cleanser, scouring pads.
  • Two dishpans (that will nest together).

Convenience Kit

  • First-aid kit and medical supplies.
  • Towels.
  • Bath soap.
  • Toilet tissue.

Tools

  • Small ax.
  • Short-handled shovel.
  • Bucket.
  • Pliers, hammer. nails. screwdriver.

Miscellaneous

  • Clothespins.
  • Rope.
  • Flashlight.
  • Lantern or stationary electric light.
  • Insect repellent.
  • Netting.
  • Gasoline can.
  • Gallon water jug.
  • Canvas water bag if traveling in desert country.
  • Folding chairs and table. (Optional, since tables and benches are provided in most improved state and national parks.)

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Grain Elevator http://haw-creek.com/grain-elevator/ http://haw-creek.com/grain-elevator/#respond Mon, 31 Jul 2017 08:00:00 +0000 http://haw-creek.com/?p=7308 21st Century Digital #30

Grain elevator, Idaho. 2005.

Photograph retrieved from the Library of Congress, www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2010630913/. (Accessed March 06, 2017.)

Credit line: Carol M. Highsmith’s America, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

Photograph: Carol M. Highsmith

Medium: 1 photograph : digital, TIFF file, color.

Highsmith, a distinguished and richly published American photographer, has donated her work to the Library of Congress since 1992. Starting in 2002, Highsmith provided scans or photographs she shot digitally with new donations to allow rapid online access throughout the world. Her generosity in dedicating the rights to the American people for copyright free access also makes this Archive a very special visual resource.

Note – This image has been digitally adjusted for one or more of the following:
– fade correction,
– color, contrast, and/or saturation enhancement
– selected spot and/or scratch removal
– cropped for composition and/or to accentuate subject matter
– straighten image

]]>
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X-15 http://haw-creek.com/x-15/ http://haw-creek.com/x-15/#respond Sun, 30 Jul 2017 15:08:00 +0000 http://haw-creek.com/?p=7414 Popular Mechanics (May 1960)

The X-15 Points into Space - Essentially a manned racket, the X-15 drops from the wings of the B-52 that carried it to 38,000 feet and blasts off. In 88 seconds. its engine can zoom it into a ballistic trajectory at speeds at up to 4000 mph.

Essentially a manned racket, the X-15 drops from the wings of the B-52 that carried it to 38,000 feet and blasts off. In 88 seconds. its engine can zoom it into a ballistic trajectory at speeds at up to 4000 mph.

The X-15 Points into Space - Essentially a manned racket, the X-15 drops from the wings of the B-52 that carried it to 38,000 feet and blasts off. In 88 seconds. its engine can zoom it into a ballistic trajectory at speeds at up to 4000 mph.

Popular Mechanices (May 1960) - More than an hour before take-off, the X-15 pilot is dressed in an $18,000 space suit made of heat-reflecting aluminum cloth. Taped to his body are sensing devices so that his rate of breathing, temperature and heartbeat can all be monitored

More than an hour before take-off, the X-15 pilot is dressed in an $18,000 space suit made of heat-reflecting aluminum cloth. Taped to his body are sensing devices so that his rate of breathing, temperature and heartbeat can all be monitored.

THE ROCKET with the man in its nose was starting its plunge toward earth and Q. C. Harvey was watching its descent on the radar screen in the high-range control room at Edwards.

Harvey pushed the button on his mike. “X-15 this is Earphone One,” he said. “You look real good. Everything appears normal. Do you read me?”

“Rog, Q.C. Have started re-entry procedure.”

The X-15 rocket was still in space over a neighboring state and yet from the windowless control room at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. the test conductor was figuratively peering over the pilot’s shoulder.

The radar plotting board showed the geographical location of the X-15 as well as its speed and altitude. Oscillographs duplicated the readings of important cockpit instruments. Technicians were watching scores of meters that told the story of temperatures, pressures and performance.

Even the heartbeat of the pilot was being recorded. All this information was coming by radar and radio telemeter from the X-15.

Q. C. Harvey is responsible for the lengthy, careful countdown that precedes a flight and can cancel it right up to drop time if something goes wrong. During a flight he advises the pilot on procedures and passes on information that may be
radioed from chase planes.

A comparioson of the X-15 and V-2 Rocket

Two-engine power plant of the X-15 is test-fired. A more powerful single-engine plant has been developed.

Flights of the X-15 at high altitudes follow the pattern (above), which is a projection for typical flights it is hoped will be made at heights up to 100 miles. Specifications for the research croft call for performance of up to 50 miles. However, it was built to go higher and will, unless heat of re-entry to the earth's atmosphere proves prohibitive.

Flights of the X-15 at high altitudes follow the pattern (above), which is a projection for typical flights it is hoped will be made at heights up to 100 miles. Specifications for the research croft call for performance of up to 50 miles. However, it was built to go higher and will, unless heat of re-entry to the earth’s atmosphere proves prohibitive.

Firemen wash down the landing area in dry lake bed after chemicals were purged from the X-15’s many tanks.

Firemen wash down the landing area in dry lake bed after chemicals were purged from the X-15’s many tanks.

Usually Q.C.’s job looks easy. The pilot flies from memory a flight he had rehearsed on a simulator. He knows when to pull the nose of the X-15 up toward the sky, when to go over the hump in a ballistic trajectory and the angle at which he should re-enter the atmosphere. Harvey can tell at once if the vehicle departs from its program. Usually nothing goes wrong but there are alternate procedures that can be adopted, alternate landing fields that can be used if something does.

The X-15 is called a manned research vehicle rather than an airplane. It has a stubby wing and landing gear so it can land like an airplane. But in most other respects it is a true rocket. In many ways it is like a wartime German V-2. It is three feet longer, weighs a couple of tons more and develops almost as much thrust. Its estimated top speed, in excess of 4000 m.p.h., compares with the 4000 m.p.h. top speed of a V-2. Its peak altitude, in excess of 100 miles, is about the same. It carries 2000 pounds of pilot and instruments instead of 2000 pounds of explosive.

Cutaway drawing of the X-15 shows how the big, 50,000-pound-thrust engine crowds the craft when installed.

Cutaway drawing of the X-15 shows how the big, 50,000-pound-thrust engine crowds the craft when installed.

Test conductor Q. C. Harvey, in dark sweater at the high-range control room, talks pilots down should something go wrong.

Test conductor Q. C. Harvey, in dark sweater at the high-range control room, talks pilots down should something go wrong.

North American Aviation has built three X-15’s under a contract with the Air Force, Navy, and National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Each craft is 50 feet long with a span of 22 feet. The skin is a heat-treated nickel-steel alloy over a structural frame of titanium and stainless steel. Aluminum is used internally. In addition to its ordinary aerodynamic controls the X-15 has eight tiny jet nozzles in the nose and four in the wings. These reaction controls are used by the pilot at the edge of space.

Ground crewman checks out cockpit instruments and controls of X-15 several days before a new flight is scheduled to begin.

Ground crewman checks out cockpit instruments and controls of X-15 several days before a new flight is scheduled to begin.

The first X-15’s early flights were powered by a pair of rocket motors that developed 16,000 pounds of thrust on water-alcohol and liquid oxygen. Later a single motor that develops 50,000 pounds of thrust on liquid ammonia and liquid oxygen was installed. The motor can be throttled, can be turned on and off in flight. It consumes more than seven tons of fuel and oxidizer in 88 seconds at full throttle. In that short time the craft accelerates from its drop speed of 500 m.p.h. to above 4000 m.p.h.

Its research done, an X-15 lands on nose wheel and two rear skids. Some 100 men are involved in each flight.

Its research done, an X-15 lands on nose wheel and two rear skids. Some 100 men are involved in each flight.

Research flights began last year and will continue into 1961. It is understood that specs on the X-15 call for a craft capable of sustained flight at Mach 6 at an altitude of 250,000 feet, roughly 50 miles above sea level. But North American designed the plane to fly higher. Eventually, climbs to 100 miles or more may be made unless it is found that the heat of re-entering the atmosphere would be too great. Even in a normal descent from 50 miles the leading edges of the nose and wing will glow bright red with heat. The X-15s are painted black so they can radiate this heat away quickly. The pilot, however, wears a bright silvery suit. Its aluminized cloth is intended to reflect heat that might build up in the cockpit during re-entry or high-speed level flight.

No single pilot has been flying the X-15. Scott Crossfield, backed by Alvin S. White, has been doing the performance flights for North American. The Air Force’s Maj. Robert M. White and NASA’s Joseph A. Walker were assigned as pilots by the purchasers. Each will alternate and each is expected to fly the craft to maximum speed and to maximum altitude.

Never before has such a complex vehicle been built, for never before was it necessary to cram so much energy, in various forms, into such a small space. Seven different gases and liquids are required.

Liquid ammonia is the engine fuel, liquid oxygen is the oxidizer. The LOX tank is something like a spool that is built around a separate, inner tank and separated from it by an air space. Liquid nitrogen at minus 300 degrees is pumped through the air space at the start of servicing and helium gas is pumped into the inner tank. The nitrogen keeps the helium cold until subzero oxygen is loaded and takes over.

The surrounding structure frosts up at the start of this operation and so hot air is circulated through other parts of the craft to prevent freezing of the hydraulic and hydrogen peroxide lines.

The hydrogen peroxide provides a high-temperature gas that drives two auxiliary powerplants, known as APUs. These generate power for the 1300 pounds of instruments and for such odd jobs as defogging the windshield on the way to drop altitude.

The cockpit and the pilot’s suit must be pressurized, and the pilot and instruments must be kept cool during portions of the flight. Liquid nitrogen (pressurized by helium) is used for this. It is converted into gas and is ducted to the instruments, to the cockpit, and to the pilot’s suit. The pilot can’t breath nitrogen, of course, and so oxygen is piped to the mask.

Some of the LOX oxidizer would boil away during the time the X-15 is being carried to its 38,000-foot drop altitude, and the pilot would consume much of his oxygen supply. To avoid this the X-15 feeds off its mother plane during the climb. The LOX tank is topped off from a tank on the B-52, the pilot breathes B-52 oxygen and gets his suit nitrogen from the B-52 until just before the drop. Hot air from the B-52 is circulated through the X-15 until its APUs are started prior to the drop.

Readying such intricate equipment demands a long and exacting countdown. Nearly 100 people are involved. The “servicing pamphlet” is actually a book 11/2 inches thick. There are 79 checkoff steps in preflighting the APUs alone.

Preparations begin five days ahead of time. Systems are inspected and operated. The rocket motor is fired. Movie cameras are installed on the mother plane. The closed-circuit TV by which the launch panel operator on the B-52 checks the X-15 during the climb is tested.

Other groups stand by. The pilots of the two F-104 chase planes, the F-100 photo plane and the photo helicopter are alerted, as are the crews of the back-up chase planes at Edwards and Palmdale.

A two-section convoy proceeds to the landing area on the dry lake bed. Included are fire fighting trucks, ambulance, a mobile crane, crash crew, purging crew, ground photographers and the radio control truck that takes over during landing.

Other crash and fire crews will be spotted at alternate landing areas. Telescopes that make space-positioning photographs of the flight are prepared. Radar and telemetry crews go to their high-range tracking stations at Ely and Beatty, in Nevada. Interested officials from through-out the country converge on Edwards.

The countdown begins 20 hours before the flight is scheduled to start. If takeoff is set for eight in the morning, the task of mounting the X-15 on the B-52 begins at noon the day before. Fueling starts at 3 a.m. and all the other gases and liquids go on board both planes on schedule.

It’s possible to “hold” at any time. Once a countdown was held five days on ac-count of weather. Strong surface winds are a bugaboo. The X-15 can land in a 25 or 30-knot wind but this would be too strong for the pilot in case of a bail-out.

More than an hour before takeoff the pilot starts his personal countdown. He has a dressing room, an air-conditioned trailer, that delivers him to the plane and takes him from it. Two men dress him in the $18,000 space suit and meanwhile the pilot goes on 100-percent oxygen, a pre-requisite for an extremely high altitude flight. Before the dressing starts, however, there are other details. Sensing devices are taped to his body so that his rate of breathing, temperature and heartbeat can be monitored. At the last moment he is driven to the plane.

The chase planes take off, then the B-52 with the black X-15 under one wing. During the half-hour climb to the drop point and altitude, the X-15 pilot has more than 50 jobs to do. He checks his radio equipment, sends preliminary bursts of data by telemeter, operates the controls that start the aircraft’s systems and reports his progress to P. C. Harvey. He finishes pressurizing the X-15 by the time the B-52 pilot gives him the one minute warning, and reports to the mother plane and test conductor that he is ready to be launched. The B-52 pilot starts a short countdown and at “one” presses the button that allows the X-15 to drop away.

Once free of the mother plane, the X-15 pilot fires his rocket motor and begins the flight scheduled for that day.

Each flight is made for different purposes. The idea is to obtain new information on such things as behavior of the vehicle at the speeds and altitudes achieved, the air pressure “Q” factors, the “G” forces, temperatures and the effects on the pilot himself.

Some knowledge from the X-15 program will be used in Project Mercury, the plan for orbiting a man around the earth in the nose cone of a rocket. The X-15 also is a forerunner to Dyna-Soar, the space glider that is intended to circle the earth in 80 minutes after being shot into orbit by a rocket. Like the X-15 pilot, the pilot of Dyna-Soar will control his craft as it re-enters the atmosphere and bring it to a safe landing at a selected spot.

Another vehicle under consideration is the X-15B, a larger version of the X-15. It would be shot into orbit as the third stage of a huge Saturn booster and would travel around the earth at 18,000 m.p.h. at 2000 miles altitude. It would carry two men, a pilot and an observer. It, too, would dive and glide back to a safe landing after using retro-rockets to decelerate. But Mercury, Dyna-Soar and the X-15B are still in the future. Unless the Russians have put a man into orbit since this was written, the X-15 program is man’s closest approach so far to true space flight.

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Toll Booth http://haw-creek.com/toll-booth/ http://haw-creek.com/toll-booth/#respond Sat, 29 Jul 2017 07:31:00 +0000 http://haw-creek.com/?p=7284 21st Century Digital #24 |

Toll booth at the entrance of Historic New Harmony, Indiana. 2009. May 9. Photograph: Carol M. Highsmith

Toll booth at the entrance of Historic New Harmony, Indiana. 2009. May 9.

New Harmony is a historic town on the Wabash River in Harmony Township, Posey County, Indiana, United States. It lies 15 miles (24 km) north of Mount Vernon, the county seat. The population was 789 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Evansville metropolitan area.

Established by the Harmony Society in 1814, the town was originally known as Harmony (also called Harmonie, or New Harmony). Bought at two dollars an acre, the 20,000-acre (8,100 ha) settlement was the brainchild of George Rapp and was home exclusively to German Lutherans in its early years. Here, the Harmonists built a new town in the wilderness, but in 1824 they decided to sell their property and return to Pennsylvania. Robert Owen, a Welsh industrialist and social reformer, purchased the town in 1825 with the intention of creating a new utopian community and renamed it New Harmony. While the Owenite social experiment was an economic failure just two years after it began, the community made some important contributions to American society.

New Harmony became known as a center for advances in education and scientific research. New Harmony’s residents established the first free library, a civic drama club, and a public school system open to men and women. Its prominent citizens included Owen’s sons, Indiana congressman and social reformer Robert Dale Owen, who sponsored legislation to create the Smithsonian Institution; David Dale Owen, a noted state and federal geologist; William Owen; and Richard Owen, state geologist, Indiana University professor, and first president of Purdue University. The town served as the second headquarters of the U.S. Geological Survey and numerous scientists and educators contributed to New Harmony’s intellectual community, including William Maclure, Marie Louise Duclos Fretageot, Thomas Say, Charles-Alexandre Lesueur, Joseph Neef, Frances Wright, and others. (Wikipedia)

Photograph retrieved from the Library of Congress, www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2010630184/. (Accessed March 05, 2017.)

Credit line: Carol M. Highsmith’s America, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

Photograph: Carol M. Highsmith

Medium: 1 photograph : digital, TIFF file, color.

Highsmith, a distinguished and richly published American photographer, has donated her work to the Library of Congress since 1992. Starting in 2002, Highsmith provided scans or photographs she shot digitally with new donations to allow rapid online access throughout the world. Her generosity in dedicating the rights to the American people for copyright free access also makes this Archive a very special visual resource.

Note – This image has been digitally adjusted for one or more of the following:
– fade correction,
– color, contrast, and/or saturation enhancement
– selected spot and/or scratch removal
– cropped for composition and/or to accentuate subject matter
– straighten image

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Covered Wagon Ferry Restored in Wyoming http://haw-creek.com/covered-wagon-ferry-restored-in-wyoming/ http://haw-creek.com/covered-wagon-ferry-restored-in-wyoming/#respond Fri, 28 Jul 2017 13:25:00 +0000 http://haw-creek.com/?p=7409 "Covered Wagon Ferry Restored in Wyoming" | article from Popular Science, June 1950from Popular Mechanics, June 1950

Increasing traffic in 1927 forced abandonment of Menor’s Ferry, for 35 years the only connection between the east and west sides at Jackson Hole, Wyo. Instead, a steel bridge was built near by over the Snake River. After 22 years of inactivity. the ferry has been restored by Rockefeller interests. The replica was achieved by examining old photographs and original remnants of the rotting ferry gear. New visitors to this ferry at Moose, Wyo. may ride across a real piece of the old West.

Carrying this old Conestoga wagon and team of horses, the ferry makes its initial trip across the Snake River after the restoration.

Carrying this old Conestoga wagon and team of horses, the ferry makes its initial trip across the Snake River after the restoration.

Menor's ferry - The current is the ferry's "motor."

Menor’s Ferry – the current is the ferry’s “motor.”

Menor's Ferry - A winch changes the angle of the boat in the current and, thus, its direction of travel.

A winch changes the angle of the boat in the current and, thus, its direction of travel.


Additional images and information:

An early photo of Menor's Ferry in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, from the days before the river was bridged.

An early photo of Menor’s Ferry in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. Note the covered wagons on the left.

Another early ferry photo from before the river was bridged. Note the early 20th century auto on the ferry and the dirt road on the far side leading from the ferry landing.

Another early ferry photo from before the river was bridged.  Note the early 20th century auto on the ferry and the dirt road on the far side leading from the ferry landing.

Menor’s Ferry after 1950 restoration carrying covered wagon and team of horses across Snake River.

Menor’s Ferry after restoration completion in 1950 carrying covered wagon and team of horses across Snake River.

The current Grand Teton National Park ferry, operated seasonally by National Park Service interpretive rangers and able to carry up to 20 passengers, was built in 1999.  The photos below are from a ride we took on it in July 2010.

National Park Service interpretive ranger operating Menor's Ferry, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

National Park Service interpretive ranger operating Menor’s Ferry, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

On board Menor’s Ferry, looking across the Snake River towards Bill Menor’s cabin and store, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

On board Menor’s Ferry, looking across the Snake River towards Bill Menor’s cabin and store.


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Katrina http://haw-creek.com/katrina/ http://haw-creek.com/katrina/#respond Mon, 24 Jul 2017 07:44:00 +0000 http://haw-creek.com/?p=7305 21st Century Digital #29

Highsmith, Carol M, photographer. Only steps left after 2005 Hurricane Katrina, Mississippi coast, Mississippi, 2006. March 3.

Only steps left after 2005 Hurricane Katrina, Mississippi coast, Mississippi, 2006. March 3.

Photograph retrieved from the Library of Congress, www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2010630054/. (Accessed March 07, 2017.)

Credit line: Carol M. Highsmith’s America, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

Photograph: Carol M. Highsmith

Medium: 1 photograph : digital, TIFF file, color.

Highsmith, a distinguished and richly published American photographer, has donated her work to the Library of Congress since 1992. Starting in 2002, Highsmith provided scans or photographs she shot digitally with new donations to allow rapid online access throughout the world. Her generosity in dedicating the rights to the American people for copyright free access also makes this Archive a very special visual resource.

Note – This image has been digitally adjusted for one or more of the following:
– fade correction,
– color, contrast, and/or saturation enhancement
– selected spot and/or scratch removal
– cropped for composition and/or to accentuate subject matter
– straighten image

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On-The-Go Camping by Wade Mitchell http://haw-creek.com/on-the-go-camping-by-wade-mitchell/ http://haw-creek.com/on-the-go-camping-by-wade-mitchell/#respond Fri, 21 Jul 2017 12:43:00 +0000 http://haw-creek.com/?p=7403 Camping Blast-from-the-Past #2

contentPopular Mechanics;  June 1969

ENGINEERS ASK RV MANUFACTURERS TO TEST BRAKES. Some experts say that within a year the Department of Transportation may require brake performance certification on all RVs. The Society of Automotive Engineers wants manufacturers to help set up workable standards. Eventually, every trailer, van and motor coach may be required to carry a plate specifying brake-stopping distances.

DISC BRAKES FOR TRAVEL TRAILERS. One of the largest manufacturers told PM privately that “disc brakes are inevitable on travel trailers.” Reasons cited include the disc brakes’ proven advantages on downhill grades, through water and in panic stops. They start stopping sooner, almost never fade. Currently, all trailers have drum brakes as standard equipment. Disc-brake kits are available now, but the question of how to power a trailer-installed disc brake is not yet settled.

CAMPER CONVERSION BOLTS TO VAN BACK! That’s right—the new Bovan unit is a compact coach-section designed to attach to the tail end of such vans as the Ford Econoline series, Dodge A-100 series and Chevy and GMC vans. The maker claims it will fit any Detroit van built since 1962 without modifications. To install a Bovan (for Back of Van) the buyer merely removes the van’s rear doors and rear bumper. The Bovan then slips into position like a glove. (Installers may use the same holes formerly used for doors. Rail clamps will complete the installation.) Bovan says that you can add one in only 30 minutes. Inside the add-a-coach section are a dinette, bed, toilet and kitchen unit. Bovan is made by Easom Engineering, Detroit, Mich.

IS A SUPER-LIGHT TENT TRAILER COMING? The sudden interest in subcompact cars has prompted new tent-trailer designs that can be towed by any of them, according to experts. Ford is already selling the Maverick and the even smaller Ford Phoenix is due in 1971. Chevrolet may market the XP 887. American Motors is expected to announce a subcompact reviving the famous name of Hornet. Can such cars tow a trailer? Maybe yes, maybe no. The aggressive tent-trailer industry won’t take chances. Scaled-down versions of the most successful deluxe models may be announced in late 1969.

HOW ABOUT AN ALL-CANVAS CAMPER TOP? You can get one now with a peaked roof, rear door and sidewall curtains in a shape amazingly similar to wood coaches. The new canvas model from Off-Road Campers, Inc., Box 158, Dearborn, Mich. 48121, weighs about 198 pounds, has nylon strip slides on all moving surfaces, independent tent-bow construction and ozone-resistant and weathertight seals. For the family with a coach-storage problem, this may be one answer.

WRAPAROUND CONTROL PANELS FOR PICKUP TRUCKS? The GMC Truck and Coach Div. has been experimenting with new control panels which monitor virtually every moving part of the vehicle. Dash instruments start to the left of the driver, then sweep across in front of him and around to his right. Everything is easily read and operated without reaching. Though the system was designed for heavy-duty carriers, the concept of wraparound control panels for pickup trucks is obviously worthwhile.

CHEVROLET ANNOUNCES AUTOMATIC VEHICLE SELECTOR. Anyone interested in Chevrolet camper vehicles can get instant statistics such as gross weight, suspension capacity, transmission options, axle ratios, trailer-hitch type and many other facts on a handy new slide-rule calculator. This highly attractive tool, called Vehicle Selector, is now available from Chevrolet dealers. It should help solve problems caused by salesmen who lack knowledge about recreation vehicles.

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Lincoln Statue http://haw-creek.com/lincoln-statue/ http://haw-creek.com/lincoln-statue/#respond Mon, 17 Jul 2017 07:27:00 +0000 http://haw-creek.com/?p=7302 21st Century Digital #28

Highsmith, Carol M, photographer. Bronze statue of Abraham Lincoln and his horse at the Lincoln Summer Home located on the grounds of the Armed Forces Retirement Home in northwest Washington, D.C. 2008.

Bronze statue of Abraham Lincoln and his horse at the Lincoln Summer Home located on the grounds of the Armed Forces Retirement Home in northwest Washington, D.C. 2008.

The sculptors are Stuart Williamson and Jiwoong Cheh; working for the design shop StudioIES in Brooklyn; New York. The statue differs from so many others of Abe in that this one actually shows him with a slight smile; as if Lincoln is greeting a valued friend or relative upon arrival at his summer home.

Photograph retrieved from the Library of Congress, www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2010630142/. (Accessed March 07, 2017.)

Credit line: Carol M. Highsmith’s America, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

Photograph: Carol M. Highsmith

Medium: 1 photograph : digital, TIFF file, color.

Highsmith, a distinguished and richly published American photographer, has donated her work to the Library of Congress since 1992. Starting in 2002, Highsmith provided scans or photographs she shot digitally with new donations to allow rapid online access throughout the world. Her generosity in dedicating the rights to the American people for copyright free access also makes this Archive a very special visual resource.

Note – This image has been digitally adjusted for one or more of the following:
– fade correction,
– color, contrast, and/or saturation enhancement
– selected spot and/or scratch removal
– cropped for composition and/or to accentuate subject matter
– straighten image

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My Three Years of Motor Camping Experiences of a Pioneer in the Game, Who Reveals the Most Useful Equipment for a Successful Motor Vacation http://haw-creek.com/my-three-years-of-motor-camping-experiences-of-a-pioneer-in-the-game-who-reveals-the-most-useful-equipment-for-a-successful-motor-vacation/ http://haw-creek.com/my-three-years-of-motor-camping-experiences-of-a-pioneer-in-the-game-who-reveals-the-most-useful-equipment-for-a-successful-motor-vacation/#comments Sat, 15 Jul 2017 11:44:28 +0000 http://haw-creek.com/?p=7395 By F. E. Brimmer, Author of “Autocamping” – Popular Science Monthly, June 1922

THREE summers ago my wife and I made our first auto-camping trip. It seemed to us a radical and hazardous enterprise; but we soon discovered, as have hundreds of others in the past year or two, that this delightful method of vacationing can be made to combine the adventure and healthfulness of Western frontier days with the comfort of a 1922 apartment hotel. We started, that first year, by packing half the contents of our kitchen into the tonneau. Since then experience has taught us what should be taken. This experience may guide the beginner in selecting everything that is essential, without burdening himself with articles that take valuable room in the car and prove unnecessary to enjoyment.

To unclamp the runningboard box from the car and convert it into a table with two shelves for cooking utensils, as shown above, takes only a minute

To unclamp the runningboard box from the car and convert it into a table with two shelves for cooking utensils, as shown above, takes only a minute

Home Comforts on the Road

Nowadays when you climb into your car and take to the open road for a summer of motor gipsying, you need not leave home behind. You may take its comforts with you. With the increasing popularity of motor camping as the great vacation sport of a nation, there has appeared on the market within the past few months a host of mechanical devices to make roadside living easy for the amateur. If you make or purchase your outfit with care, you can tour the country for four months or more without once stopping at a hotel, or realizing that you are “roughing it.”

My Three Years of Motor Camping Experiences of a Pioneer in the Game, Who Reveals the Most Useful Equipment for a Successful Motor Vacation -- During five years of gipsying all over the United States, this flivver tourist has accumulated a moving natural history museum

During five years of gipsying all over the United States, this flivver tourist has accumulated a moving natural history museum

The Auto Tent—One of the most important of the new devices is the auto tent, which is made especially for comfortable shelter in motor camps. Some styles you attach to the car, while others are pitched independently.  Some are so adaptable that you may or may not attach them, whichever you desire; but all types are superior to the old style tent that was designed for other purposes. A good auto tent may be made as cozy as (and far cooler than) a summer cottage.

In selecting the auto tent, I have found that the best way is to choose a model that will roll into a compact bundle, weigh as little as possible, and still be commodious and waterproof. It should he possible to put it up and take it down in five minutes at most—and this, if necessary, by one person. Get as much head room as possible. If an adult can stand erect, anywhere in the tent, living will be far more comfortable. There should he one or two screened windows with curtains.

I have discovered that all the usual tent materials have their advantages. Balloon silk is costlier than canvas, but much lighter in weight and fully as efficient. Of course, both silk and canvas give better service when pitched in the shade, and a fly can be used to excellent advantage if a long stay is made in one place. Army duck, double filled, in 29-inch width and 10-ounce weight, which has been waterproofed, has proved to be very satisfactory under all conditions, even in snow country. Airplane cloth and silkette are other varieties of excellent tenting material offered the tourist.

My Three Years of Motor Camping Experiences of a Pioneer in the Game, Who Reveals the Most Useful Equipment for a Successful Motor Vacation -- These gipsies pack all their luggage in an odd single-wheeled trailer consisting of a case supported by bars that are attached to the rear of the chassis

These gipsies pack all their luggage in an odd single-wheeled trailer consisting of a case supported by bars that are attached to the rear of the chassis

I have found that the color of a tent should be carefully considered. White is conspicuous and hard on the eyes of the occupants in sunlight, and at night every move of the persons in a lighted camp makes a shadow that reveals plainly what is going on inside. Either brown, khaki, or green canvas blends better with the landscape. The light transmitted is easier on the eyes and the walls are more opaque when the camp is illuminated at night.

How to Start the Trip Right

AUTOMOBILE camping. within the past year or two, has become one of the most popular American vacation pastimes. In the accompanying article a pioneer among motor campers describes some of the essentials for a successful gipsy tour, which he learned in three years of actual experience.

Those of you who are planning a summertime auto camping trip will find these suggestions helpful. In addition, our Home Workshop Department tells you this month just how you can make your own equipment. Instructions for converting a car into a “house on wheels” appear on page 77. You can learn how to make a tent, page 80; a camping table, page 101; a folding camping stove, page 102: or even a trailer for your car, page 103.

And it you are interested in how motor gipsies live on the road, read the prize-winning letters on page 70 and pictures of modern motor caravans on page 71.

The very latest tent for auto camping is a combination tent and bed. In this style of camp the bed forms the foundation for the tent, supporting its poles or frame. We have used several styles of tent-bed combinations and find that from the standpoint of comfort there is little difference be tween the combination and the tent itself. You can take your choice.

The Auto-Camp Bed—Comfortable bedsmean comfortable camps, and our experience is that the double or single folding cot is excellent. We have used a double cot 52 inches wide, 78 inches long, and 18 inches high. When folded, this bed is 39 inches long, 10 inches wide, by 5 inches thick. We carry this in our car in place of the foot rail.

The single cot of “automatic“ style is excellent. This automatically makes a level surface to sleep on, no matter how uneven the ground upon which the cot is placed.

The tonneau, or car bed, which is generally suspended from the windshield to the rear of the car body, hanging over the seats, has its advantages. We have carried such a bed, weighing less than 8 pounds, and making a bundle about 4 inches in diameter, strapped to the top frame of our car. The tonneau bed is excellent for children, for an extra or emergency bed; but I cannot recommend it for permanent sleeping quarters. It has little head room and is none too easy to get into.

A Wide Choice of Beds

The pneumatic, or air bed—sometimes called a “comfort sleeping pocket,” because the air mattresses are covered with a waterproof blanket that snaps in place to form a pocket in which one sleeps—is an ideal auto-camper’s bed. When deflated and rolled, our double 42-inch air bed is about 12 inches in diameter, 42 inches long, and the weight is about 25 pounds, depending on the material of the waterproof covering and the weight of the wool lining in this air sleeping pocket. On our double air bed my wife and our younger daughter, who was but six months old on her first trip, have slept in the comfort of home. The air mattresses taper thinner at the foot and an “inner wall” construction has done away with the sliding sensation of the first pneumatic beds. A pump, larger of cylinder than a foot pump, but not nearly so effective and much lighter, comes with the air pocket. Personally I have always inflated our double bed with my lungs, which at most takes but five minutes.

When Nights Are Chilly

Some kind of bedding is needed with practically every style of bed. With our air bed we have used an eiderdown robe in cold weather. We also prefer a good woolen sleeping bag, or nest of two or three bags, to any ordinary wool blanket. Two 4½-pound woolen bags, nested together and covered with a waterproof canvas, make ideal bedding.

Auto-Camping Stoves—When the nights are chilly in high altitudes or during the cooler seasons, a collapsible, folding stove that burns wood has been indispensable to us. Baby has been undressed and dressed many times in the radius of its cheering warmth. The stove folds to 28 by 10 by 4½ inches, including its eight feet of pipe, two elbows, damper, four legs, bottom, lid lift, and top lid. Carried in a canvas case this wood stove is smaller than a suitcase. For cooking, a very popular automobile camping stove is the two-burner gasoline firemaker. You have the fuel with you, heat is obtained quickly, there is no odor, and our experience is that the stove is safe to use anywhere in camp. You may have the gasoline stove with oven, frypan, spider, breadpan, etc., making a complete kitchenette. One of the very latest auto-camp stoves, and a model that we found most efficient last summer, is the compressed acetylene-gas burner. It should be mentioned that this same gas may be used for lighting your camp, and indeed you may cook and illuminate simultaneously. When empty, the tank may be exchanged for a filled one. The tank is a cylinder 6 by 20 inches. The light has a maximum intensity of 500 candlepower, which is plenty strong enough to sew or read by in comfort.

My Three Years of Motor Camping Experiences of a Pioneer in the Game, Who Reveals the Most Useful Equipment for a Successful Motor Vacation -- Just a few items of the author's 1922 camping equipment—a shot gun that folds like a jack-knife, an axe and two steel knives with sheaths, and a compressed acetylene-gas burner for cooking or lighting in the camp

Just a few items of the author’s 1922 camping equipment—a shot gun that folds like a jack-knife, an axe and two steel knives with sheaths, and a compressed acetylene-gas burner for cooking or lighting in the camp

Refrigerator Basket—If you intend to set out motor gipsying with a baby, as we do, carry a refrigerator basket. With this basket icebox we carry our butter, fresh milk, fresh fruit, baby’s modified milk, fresh meat, and indeed all perishable food. In camp we have the same food that we would eat at home! What is more, this basket is built to be dustproof and most sanitary. It is an excellent place in which to keep the drinking water, iced tea, or fruit beverages.

Kitchen Utensils that Pack Tightly

The refrigerator basket has a varnished exterior of woven reed, and a metal lining (the ice compartment is detachable), while between the two is an insulation that is a non-conductor of heat.

Cooking Utensils—By all means, do not take along your kitchen utensils. We found by sad experience that utensils collected from the kitchen cabinet never would become friendly on a camping trip, nor would they pack neatly together. We use a four-party aluminum set that comprises everything we could need—frypans, plates, coffee-pot, several pots with covers and bails, knives, forks, table and tea
spoons, salt and pepper shakers, cups and bowls. And the whole thing nests together, having detachable and folding handles, so that it packs in a canvas case 10 inches in diameter and about the same in height, while the weight is less than 10 pounds.

We have recently used a runningboard box that is about 9 inches square by 33 inches long, and which, when unclamped from the car, can be changed in 60 seconds into a table 27 by 33 inches, with complete set of oval heavy tin dishes and utensils, including a gasoline stove,
oven, and frypans.

Pick Your Camp Sites in Advance

“WHERE shall l find a good place to camp?” is the ever lasting question that the gipsy motorist must answer
at sundown, wherever the end of the day’s joumey brings him—in city. town. or country.

The motor camper is always on the lookout for a spot where he and his family may rest comfortably without disturbance and where simple necessities or conveniences for life out of doors are obtainable. Formerly he often wasted his time in vain search.

But now hundreds of convenient campsites are being set aside by cities and communities in all parts of the country, especially by those located along America’s great transcontinental highways.

Just how can you find these sites during your trip?

lt’s easy this season; for an official camping and campsite manual has just been compiled by the American Automobile Association. This manual contains a list of more than 800 automobile campsites in all sections of the country, with exact location, description of equipment, and other detailed information for the motor camper, such as the number of autos the site will accommodate, water and wood supply, lighting facilities, playgrounds and amusements.

By special arrangement with the American Automobile Association, POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY is able to supply readers with copies of this invaluable manual. Send your request for a copy to the Automobile Camping Editor, Popular Science Monthly, 225 West 39th St.., New York City, enclosing 50 cents and a self-addressed, stamped envelope.

Auto-Camp Furniture—As for furniture, we used to camp without a table, but this is not advisable. Folding chairs are compact and light in weight. A folding cupboard is homelike and handy. We should not know how to live without our folding washbasin. You may buy infants’ dressing-tables and bathtubs if you like. They all fold to almost nothing. We find it highly advisable to carry a regular motor first-aid kit in a steel box, and the feeling of security that such a kit gives is worth much.

My Three Years of Motor Camping Experiences of a Pioneer in the Game, Who Reveals the Most Useful Equipment for a Successful Motor Vacation -- It's just like home when the author sets up camp. He is seen at the extreme left, taking butter from his refrigerator basket, while his wife cooks lunch over a small gas burner. Their tent is of light balloon silk


It’s just like home when the author sets up camp. He is seen at the extreme left, taking butter from his refrigerator basket, while his wife cooks lunch over a small gas burner. Their tent is of light balloon silk

Other useful articles for camp are an axe with sheath, two good steel knives with sheaths, a matchbox of the waterproofed variety, and various personal toilet articles, hardware, mending outfits, and working tools. I always carry a folding firearm—either a rifle or shotgun that folds like a jack-knife. Then we have game in season and are protected at all times.

A Candle Is the Simplest

Camp Illumination—The simplest illumination is a candle, but be sure to take a plumber’s candle. This is large in diameter, short of height, and burns a long time with a good light. We set the candle in a frypan, where there is no danger if it over turns. Or, better yet, carry it in a candle lantern. Many campers use a trouble light for camp, using electricity from the car battery. We can recommend the batteryless flashlamp for auto camping, for you are never fearful of exhausting a battery. We have found the ideal light is produced by the acetylene-gas lamp. This can be turned high for letter-writing or sewing, having a maximum of 500 candlepower.

My Three Years of Motor Camping Experiences of a Pioneer in the Game, Who Reveals the Most Useful Equipment for a Successful Motor Vacation -- Pullman car conveniences are included in this motorized home

Pullman car conveniences are included in this motorized home


Camping Trailer
—The complete outfit for a protracted tour may seem bulky, but we have found that the trailer is excellent behind a heavy car and does not look too ungainly. It increases our gasbill about five per cent. The draw-pull of the average trailer-which weighs about 750 pounds—is between 20 and 25 pounds on the level road. Most trailers fold flat and if they are to be protected from the dust they must be covered by a very tight canvas.

Eat, Sleep, and Feel Better

With the hundreds of modern camping conveniences to choose from, we take our home with us. The world of automobile roads is our front yard! We have the independence of the feudal lord with all modern reservations. We live along the road and in municipal camping parks just the same as at home; we sleep better, eat better, and feel better.

It is our opinion that auto camping is becoming the most popular form of American vacation.

My Three Years of Motor Camping Experiences of a Pioneer in the Game, Who Reveals the Most Useful Equipment for a Successful Motor Vacation -- The interior view of a motorized home, showing how upholstered seats are made into a curtained berth.

The interior view of a motorized home, showing how upholstered seats are made into a curtained berth.

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Seward Highway http://haw-creek.com/seward-highway/ http://haw-creek.com/seward-highway/#respond Mon, 10 Jul 2017 07:43:00 +0000 http://haw-creek.com/?p=7299 21st Century Digital #27

Scenic Seward Highway in the Chugach National Forest, Alaska. Chugach Mountains 2008. August 6.

Seward Highway showcases the natural beauty of south central Alaska between Anchorage and Seward. From jagged peaks and alpine meadows to breathtaking fjords and crystal lakes, find a concentrated series of diverse landscapes and experiences.

Photograph retrieved from the Library of Congress, www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2010630954/ (Accessed March 11, 2017.)

Credit line: Carol M. Highsmith’s America, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

Photograph: Carol M. Highsmith

Medium: 1 photograph : digital, TIFF file, color.

Highsmith, a distinguished and richly published American photographer, has donated her work to the Library of Congress since 1992. Starting in 2002, Highsmith provided scans or photographs she shot digitally with new donations to allow rapid online access throughout the world. Her generosity in dedicating the rights to the American people for copyright free access also makes this Archive a very special visual resource.

Note – This image has been digitally adjusted for one or more of the following:
– fade correction,
– color, contrast, and/or saturation enhancement
– selected spot and/or scratch removal
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Antique trucks http://haw-creek.com/antique-trucks/ http://haw-creek.com/antique-trucks/#comments Mon, 03 Jul 2017 07:20:00 +0000 http://haw-creek.com/?p=7294 21st Century Digital #26

Highsmith, Carol M, photographer. Antique trucks and cars along the road, Montana. 2005.

Antique trucks and cars along the road, Montana. 2005.

Photograph retrieved from the Library of Congress, www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2010630871/. (Accessed March 06, 2017.)

Credit line: Carol M. Highsmith’s America, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

Photograph: Carol M. Highsmith

Medium: 1 photograph : digital, TIFF file, color.

Highsmith, a distinguished and richly published American photographer, has donated her work to the Library of Congress since 1992. Starting in 2002, Highsmith provided scans or photographs she shot digitally with new donations to allow rapid online access throughout the world. Her generosity in dedicating the rights to the American people for copyright free access also makes this Archive a very special visual resource.

Note – This image has been digitally adjusted for one or more of the following:
– fade correction,
– color, contrast, and/or saturation enhancement
– selected spot and/or scratch removal
– cropped for composition and/or to accentuate subject matter
– straighten image

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No Selfie Sticks http://haw-creek.com/no-selfie-sticks/ http://haw-creek.com/no-selfie-sticks/#respond Wed, 28 Jun 2017 06:32:00 +0000 http://haw-creek.com/?p=7363 Sign, Sign, Everywhere a Sign #21 |

Danger! No Selfie Sticks on the platform sign at a Japan Rail station

Danger! No Selfie Sticks on the platform sign at a Japan Rail station
Use of “selfie sticks” is prohibited on the platform!

By Alexander Klink (Own work) [CC BY 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Accessed March 2017

Note – This image has been digitally adjusted for one or more of the following:
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Ruth Glacier http://haw-creek.com/ruth-glacier/ http://haw-creek.com/ruth-glacier/#respond Mon, 26 Jun 2017 07:02:00 +0000 http://haw-creek.com/?p=7289 21st Century Digital #25

Ruth Glacier, Denali National Park, Alaska. Alaska 2008. August 6.

Ruth Glacier is a glacier in Denali National Park and Preserve in the U.S. state of Alaska. Its upper reaches are almost three vertical miles (4.8 km) below the summit of Denali. The glacier’s “Great Gorge” is one mile (1.6 km) wide, and drops almost 2,000 feet (610 m) over ten miles (16 km), with crevasses along the surface. Above the surface on both sides are 5,000-foot (1,500-m) granite cliffs. From the top of the cliffs to the bottom of the glacier is a height exceeding that of the Grand Canyon. Ruth Glacier moves at a rate of 3.3 feet (1 m) a day and was measured to be 3,800 feet (1,200 m) thick in 1983.

Surrounding the Ruth Gorge are many mountains of the Alaska Range, including the Mooses Tooth, with highly technical ice and rock climbs on their faces. (Wikipedia)

Photograph retrieved from the Library of Congress, www.loc.gov/item/2010630826/. (Accessed March 06, 2017.)

Credit line: Carol M. Highsmith’s America, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

Photograph: Carol M. Highsmith

Medium: 1 photograph : digital, TIFF file, color.

Highsmith, a distinguished and richly published American photographer, has donated her work to the Library of Congress since 1992. Starting in 2002, Highsmith provided scans or photographs she shot digitally with new donations to allow rapid online access throughout the world. Her generosity in dedicating the rights to the American people for copyright free access also makes this Archive a very special visual resource.

Note – This image has been digitally adjusted for one or more of the following:
– fade correction,
– color, contrast, and/or saturation enhancement
– selected spot and/or scratch removal
– cropped for composition and/or to accentuate subject matter
– straighten image

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