April 1937–Improved Trailer Fittings Make Life on Wheels More Comfortable

Popular Science July 1937

Every amateur trailer builder incorporates into his home on wheels various inexpensive conveniences to make it more livable and comfortable. Many ideas for fittings and accessories were submitted in our recent trailer contest, and here are seven suggestions that won prizes:

Stove Canopy. The canopy illustrated, according to its designer, Harold P. Rykken, will get rid of most of the cooking odors and gas fumes from the trailer stove, and when the weather is chilly, it can easily be converted into a heater. The material is 26-gauge galvanized or black iron.

1937 Popular Science -- Stove Canopy for a camper trailer. The canopy illustrated will get rid of most of the cooking odors and gas fumes from the trailer stove, and when the weather is chilly, it can easily be converted into a heater.

To use as a heater, the front shutter is slipped into the side channels and then up into the upper channel. The 9-in. tube near the top of the campy is for additional heating surface and can be used for warming small dishes when the “oven” doors are closed. If this feature is omitted…, (read more at Improved Trailer Fittings Make Life on Wheels More Comfortable)

camping, camping gear, history, RV, rv equipment, vintage articles, vintage RV
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Pathfinder

Our July 2010 campsite at Pathfinder Reservoir was in a pretty spot, right on the shore. It was a short drive from our last campground, only 90 miles, but we had visited a couple of places along the way, the National Historic Trails Interpretive Center and Fort Caspar, both at Casper, Wyoming.

Camped at Pathfinder Reservoir, Wyoming, July 12, 2010

Blogging Older Photos 

I am getting around to editing older photos – some from home – many from trips we’ve taken.  Once I’m though with edits for a location and/or date, I am sharing some of the images and, in many instances, writing about the photos’ subjects or providing information.

We had been planning to stop 2 days, but were prepared to move on after 1 night if we didn’t like it.  After getting to the camp ground, we decided to pay for 3  nights.

Pathfinder Reservoir is one of several reservoirs in the North Platte Project that provide water storage for  irrigation and other uses in Wyoming and Nebraska.  The reservoir is located about 47 miles southwest of Casper and is fed by the North Platte River and the smaller Sweetwater River.

Camped at Pathfinder Reservoir, Wyoming, July 12, 2010

The winter of 2009/2010 had seen significantly higher snowfall than normal.  As a result, when we visited, Pathfinder Reservoir was at maximum capacity.

Pathfinder Reservoir, Wyoming, July 12, 2010

We had arrived at Pathfinder on a Sunday afternoon.  Quite a few weekend campers were still there, some with boats, and at another campground loop a short distance up the access road.  Not long after we set up camp, nearly everyone was gone, except for a few people swimming.  By the time we were at supper, everyone was gone. A short while later,  a young couple tent camping  set up their camp on the opposite side of the campground.

Twilight at Pathfinder Reservoir, Wyoming, July 12, 2010

beach, campground, camping, Class C, lake, landscape, photography, places, recreation areas, river, Wyoming
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Bullock’s

Pathfinder Reservoir, Wyoming July 11, 2010
After visiting the National Historic Trails Interpretive Center and Fort Caspar on July 11, 2010. we continued on to Pathfinder Reservoir, where we set up camp right on the shore.

In the midst of the heavy rustling of cottonwood leaves and the lapping of waves on the shore, a twittering and chittering could be heard. At first it seemed to be just a part of the background of the windy day at Wyoming’s Pathfinder Reservoir. On investigation, though, it turned to be an upset female Bullock’s Oriole.

Blast from the Past!

This post was originally posted on August 30, 2010 during our western U.S. vacation. I am bringing it forward as a “blast from the past” post.

Female Bullock’s Oriole, Pathfinder Reservoir, Wyoming, July 2010

Her mate seemed to be busy flying back and forth and searching for food.

Male Bullock’s Oriole, Pathfinder Reservoir, Wyoming, July 2010

Male Bullock’s Oriole, Pathfinder Reservoir, Wyoming, July 2010

Male Bullock’s Oriole, Pathfinder Reservoir, Wyoming, July 2010

These were the only Bullock’s Orioles we saw on the whole trip.

beach, campground, camping, Class C, critters, lake, photography, RV, travel, wildlife, Wyoming
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More on Fort Caspar

We visited Fort Caspar on July 11, 2010, after our stop at the National Historic Trails Interpretive Center.

(Note: Curvature of some of these images is a result of stitching several photos together into a panorama image.)

Sutler Store, Fort Caspar, Wyoming, July 11, 2010
Sutler Store, Fort Caspar, Wyoming, July 11, 2010

Sutler Store – Built in 1862 by the civilian trader or sutler accompanying the troops from Ohio.  It would not have had any direct relationship to the Guinard trading establishment.  The sutler was commissioned by the regiment, moving with the troops from one station to another and supplying soldiers with a variety of goods, including clothing, tobacco, food, and liquor. (Sign at Fort Caspar)

Guinard Trading Post – Living Quarters – Telegrapgh Office, Fort Caspar, Wyoming, July 11, 2010
Guinard Trading Post – Living Quarters – Telegrapgh Office, Fort Caspar, Wyoming, July 11, 2010

Guinard Trading Post – Originally built in 1859 by Guinard for his family’s private quarters, store room, and trading post, Guinard leased the end room to the Pacific Telegraph Company in 1861 to house the telegraph office.  There is a likelihood that the U.S. Army acquired these buildings when Quinard departed sometime between 1862 – 1864. (Sign at Fort Caspar)

Barracks and Mess Hall, Fort Caspar, Wyoming, July 11, 2010
Barracks and Mess Hall, Fort Caspar, Wyoming, July 11, 2010

Built onto the existing Guinard structures in 1862 by the U.s. Army, these three rooms were used as barracks and mess hall.  The crude bunks slept two men to a bed. Soldiers from the 11th Ohio Volunteer Cavalry were stationed here beginning in 1862.  The 11th Kansas Volunteer Cavalry, Third U.S. Infantry and Sixth U.S. Infantry replaced the Ohio volunteers in the summer of 1865. (Sign at Fort Caspar)

Barracks and Mess Hall, Fort Caspar, Wyoming, July 11, 2010
Barracks and Mess Hall, Fort Caspar, Wyoming, July 11, 2010

Army Commissary, Fort Caspar, Wyoming, July 11, 2010
Army Commissary, Fort Caspar, Wyoming, July 11, 2010

Commissary – Built by the U.S. Army in 1862, the commissary storehouse housed the garrison’s foodstuffs and supplies.  A typical army meal on the frontier included hardtack, salt pork, rice, coffee, beans and brown sugar.  To supplement their army diet, soldiers could purchase food items from the post sutler and grow vegetables from small gardens.  (Fort Caspar sign)

Army Commissary, Fort Caspar, Wyoming, July 11, 2010
Army Commissary, Fort Caspar, Wyoming, July 11, 2010

history, museum, parks, photography, Wyoming
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Fort Caspar

 Fort Caspar (reconstruction), Casper, Wyoming, July 11, 2010
Fort Caspar (reconstruction), Casper, Wyoming, July 11, 2010

During the summer of 1859, Louis Guinard, a French Canadian married to a Shoshoni woman, completed a toll bridge, 1000 feet long and 17 feet wide, over the North Platte River in the vicinity of modern day Casper, Wyoming.  Known both as Guinard’s Bridge and the Upper Platte Bridge, it was built where a ferry had had operated for several years for Mormon emigrants.  Another toll bridge, about five miles downstream, had been built by another French Canadian, John Baptiste Richard in 1852.  Known as “Renshaw’s Bridge” due to Richard’s pronunciation of his own last name in his thick French accent, it was sometimes referred to as Lower Platte Bridge after Guinard’s bridge was completed.

Guinard also built a trading post on the south side of the river, adjacent to the bridge.  The trading post also served as a stagecoach and Pony Express station as well as a telegraph office.

When the Civil War began, most army troops from the western army posts and forts were withdrawn. Along with the passage of trail emigrants, encroachment by miners, ranchers and others brought friction in the region with the Lakota Sioux and Cheyenne tribes in the early to mid 1860s.  The Army sent a detachment of of troops in 1861 to guard the bridge and, in part, to protect the new telegraph line.  The next year, the Army purchased Guinard’s  station.  Now called Platte Bridge Station, the new army post was expanded and outfitted as a one-company military post.

Located near present day Casper, Wyoming, Platte Bridge Station guarded the  upper  crossing of the North Platte River.

Following the December 1864 Sand Creek Massacre in Colorado, about 4000 Lakota, Southern Cheyenne, and Southern Arapaho, including about 1,000 warriors moved north from Colorado and Kansas to join northern relatives in the Powder River Country. The next spring, the Lakota and Cheyenne decided to attack along the North Platte River during the summer.  A primary target was to be the Platte Bridge Station.

Battle at Platte Bridge Station, July 1865 – painted in 1933 by William Henry Jackson
Battle at Platte Bridge Station, July 1865
Painted in 1933 by William Henry Jackson

On July 24, 1865, an Indian army camped a few miles from Platte Bridge Station. The next day, a group of ten warriors attempted to draw soldiers across the bridge and to the hills into an ambush.  The appearance of excited young warriors on the horizon frightened  soldiers back to the post, spoiling the ambush.

Before dawn on July 26, a detachment of 14 infantry, led by Captain Adam Leib,  and 6 cavalry troops, under Henry C. Bretney, arrived from Sweetwater Station on their way to Laramie for supplies and over-due payroll.  They found the station on 50% guard, molding lead bullets. Their arrival brought the stations complement to 120 soldiers.

Leib informed Major Martin Anderson, the station commander, that the detachment had passed a small train of 5 empty mule-drawn wagons returning from Sweetwater to Laramie.  The train was manned by 14 teamsters, escorted by 11 enlisted cavalry soldiers. While officers at the post discussed sending out a relief force to drive off the Indians, none was dispatched that day.

The next day, all the post officers declined to lead the relief force, some placing themselves on the sick list.  Second Lieutenant Caspar W. Collins, of the 11th Ohio Volunteer cavalry, en route back to his company farther west, had arrived at the station the day before.  Collins was ordered to lead the relief.

Battle of Platte Bridge (Wikipedia)

At dawn numerous Indians were observed by sentinels on the surrounding hills observing the station. At 7:00 a.m. a larger force forded the river east of the station and rode just out of rifle range, taunting the garrison. Collins and a small detachment of 25 men of the 11th Kansas crossed the Platte Bridge at a walk, then formed into a column of fours and rode west along the north bank at a trot to drive off any hostile Indians. Behind him, a 30-man contingent of the 3rd U.S.V.I. and its 11th Ohio Volunteer Cavalry escort crossed the bridge on foot as a support force for Collins, forming a skirmish line after they observed 400 Cheyenne emerge from the sand hills and arroyos between themselves and Collins.

The Indians had concealed large bands of warriors near the bridge and over the crest of the hills, possibly as many as a thousand Lakota, Cheyenne and Arapaho. Collins wheeled his detachment into two lines and charged the first group to emerge, only to find himself heavily outnumbered. He then ordered a retreat to the bridge by breaking through the Cheyenne to his rear. Simultaneously, yet another large force, this of Lakota, rushed the bridge from the south. The skirmish line at the bridge held the Lakota at bay with volley fire until 21 of the 26 troopers with Collins, all wounded to some extent, fought their way through. Five were killed, including Collins, who was wounded in the hip and shot in the forehead with an arrow while trying to aid a wounded soldier.

In addition to the losses at Platte Bridge, all 26 men of the supply train were killed.

Following the battle, additional troops were stationed at the Platte bridge post, which was renamed Fort Casper in Collin’s honor, though the name was misspelled. His given name was used as there was already a Fort Collins in Colorado, named after his father.

Construction of the Union Pacific to the south and removal of the telegraph line to the southern route diminished the importance of Fort Casper. It was abandoned in 1867, with some of its materials used in the construction of Fort Fetterman.

The fort was reconstructed in 1836 by local workers funded by the federal Work Projects Administration.  Built on the foundations of the original fort using sketches made by Lieutenant Collins in 1863, the reconstruction bears the proper spelling of Collins’ given name, Fort Caspar.

Fort Caspar is owned by the City of Casper, which also operates a museum at the site.

Fort Caspar’s reconstruction reflects the post’s appearance during the years 1863 – 1865, when it was called Platte Bridge Station.
Fort Caspar’s reconstruction reflects the post’s appearance during the
years 1863 – 1865, when it was called Platte Bridge Station.

history, museum, parks, photography, plains, Wyoming
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